woensdag 29 september 2010

Fine lines

You need:

  1. black construction paper 20 by 12 cm
  2. coloured construction paper A4 size
  3. pencil
  4. ruler
  5. scissors
  6. cutter and cutting mat
  7. glue

This lesson is about lines. What kind of lines do you know? Straight, wavy, curved, bumpy, broken, spiral, zig-zag. Discuss different types of lines and let students draw examples on the blackboard.

Draw with a pencil nine different lines on the black paper with 2 cm between them. Cut the sheet carefully following the lines and place the individual pieces in cut order on the coloured paper. Draw with a pencil on the left and bottom of the colored sheet lines on 1 cm from the side. Paste the first black strip on the coloured sheet against the drawn lines. Paste the other strips with about a half cm space between them against the pencil line left.

When all stripes are pasted, cut at the top and right the excess coloured paper away leaving a frame of 1 cm.

zondag 26 september 2010

Tumbling blocks

Even though I'm not a fan of colouring pages, this one was a hit in my classroom! You need:
  1. printed sheet with tumbling blocks
  2. markers

I downloaded a sheet with tumbling blocks on Incompetech, a site full of free downloadable graph papers. Students had to choose three colours markers to colour the blocks. When finished, cut the drawing and paste it on a coloured background.

vrijdag 24 september 2010

There's a ghost in my bedroom!

Made by Maarten, 11 years old

You need:

  1. white drawing paper A5 size
  2. indian ink
  3. dip pen
  4. pencil
  5. paper towel
  6. black paper for background

Help, there are ghosts in my bedroom! Behind the wardrobe, Achter de kast, under the bed, under the rug.... Sketch your room with a pencil: bed, wardrobe, toys, window, door. Draw ghosts on several places. Trace the drawing with indian ink. Leave the ghosts white, and fill the rest of the drawing in with various textures. Look for a lesson on texture at this link: Exercise in drawing texture. Paste the drawing on a black sheet.

Made by Floor, 11 years old

donderdag 23 september 2010

Mirror faces

You need:

  1. white drawing paper A4 size
  2. ruler
  3. pencil
  4. markers
Which facial expressions do you know? How do you draw the expression of a face? Talk about faces and emotions and show students with pictures or quick drawings how faces can change with certain emotions. Consider the state of the mouth, eyes and eyebrows. Divide the sheet into four sections by drawing three diagonal lines from top to bottom to bottom. Then draw a diagonal line from about the middle of the short side to the first vertical line. Do the same to the second line, third line and go through to the other short side of the sheet. See picture a.

Picture a.
Then pull vertical diagonal lines from top to bottom; be sure the lines go right through the middle of the sections. See picture b.

Picture b.

Draw the half of a face to the red line of the first upper left section and draw the mirror image on the other side of the red line. Choose two colours markers. Colour the facial parts of one half. Colour the background or the other half, leaving the facial parts white. Draw another face in the section below and colour it as written above, but change coloured in white. See picture c.

Picture c.

Finish the drawing and draw as many facial expressions as you know. Colour everything, alternating white and colour as a checkerboard. See picture d.

Picture d.

zondag 19 september 2010

Magnificent magnifier

You need:

  1. drawing sheet A4 size
  2. colour pencils
  3. coloured paper for background
  4. magnyfying glass

Give students a magnifying glass and send them out to look how things increase looking through it. How does a blade of grass look through the magnifier? Or tree bark? Leaves? Flowers? Insects?

For this lesson children draw something from nature. Part of the drawing has to be seen through a magnifying glass. This magnifying glass will actually be drawn too. That what is seen through the magnifying glass, has obviously to be much more detailed as the environment.

zaterdag 18 september 2010

Stained glass spiderweb

You need:

  1. black construction paper 15 by 15 cm
  2. transparant drying glue
  3. pencil
  4. ruler
  5. metallic markers

Draw a horizontal and vertical line through the middle of the paper. Draw two diagonal lines too. Trace these lines with transparent drying glue. Draw circles with the glue around the middle. Then draw glue circles around the center, each with one centimeter space between them. Waint until the glue has dried and colour the spaces between the lines with metallic markers. Trace the glue lines with a silver marker.

woensdag 15 september 2010

Birds in the style of Corneille (2nd lesson)

This lesson about Corneille is almost the same as the lesson I posted a few days earlier. However, drawings in this lesson are made with oilpastels by students in a lower grade. You need:
  1. white drawing paper A4 size
  2. oil pastels
  3. coloured ink
  4. brushes
  5. jar with water
  6. coloured paper for background
  7. glue or stapler
Life and work of Corneille
Guillaume Cornelis Beverloo (1922 - 2010), Corneille, was a Dutch artist who is born in Belgium and died this month in France. He is buried in the same cemetery as Vincent van Gogh, a painter who was highly admired by Corneille. As a painter Corneille is an autodidact. In his early years, he painted realistic: still lifes, people and landscapes.
In 1948 Corneille was involved in the creation of the CoBRA Group, a group of Danish (Copenhagen), Belgian (Brussels) and Dutch (Amsterdam) artists. Even writers and poets belong to the CoBRA group. The artists' group leaves only three years, but has been the basic for the work of Corneille. According to Corneille, the CoBRA artists want to express themselves on a expressionistic way, like children, by playing unprejudiced with colours and shapes.
Since 1950 Corneille lived and worked in Paris. His paintings are bright and colourful. The sun, women, paradise, trees and birds are recurring elements. He is particularly fond of birds. His artist name Corneille is French for 'crow'.
What to do?
Show examples of Corneille's work on the digital board. What issues do you often see in his paintings? What do you notice about his style? Discuss the salient features: bright colours, thick black outlines, few details, painted as if it was made by a child, an image that sometimes is not complete (missing parts at the edges).
Draw the outline of a bird with a black crayon and make sure this animal reaches at three edges of the sheet: it should be big! Colour the bird in bright colours and/or patterns. Paint the background with deluted blue ink. Glue or staple the drawing on a coloured sheet.
All artworks made by students of grade 3

maandag 13 september 2010

Report of my holiday

You need:

  1. white drawing sheet A3 size
  2. colour pencils
  3. markers
  4. atlas

At the beginning of a new year in school children often make a drawn report of their holiday. Where have you been? Where is that area of country? Which language is spoken there? What What currency is used? What have you done there? Where did you stay? To which sites have you been? What else did you do there?

The mission is: make a drawn holiday report and write interesting information in your drawing.

Both works are made by students of 11 years old

zaterdag 11 september 2010

In the style of Corneille

You need:
  1. white drawing paper A3 size
  2. tempera paint
  3. brushes
  4. paper towels
  5. jar with water
  6. coloured paper for background
  7. glue or stapler
Life and work of Corneille
Guillaume Cornelis Beverloo (1922 - 2010), Corneille, was a Dutch artist who is born in Belgium and died this month in France. He is buried in the same cemetery as Vincent van Gogh, a painter who was highly admired by Corneille. As a painter Corneille is an autodidact. In his early years, he painted realistic: still lifes, people and landscapes. In 1948 Corneille was involved in the creation of the CoBRA Group, a group of Danish (Copenhagen), Belgian (Brussels) and Dutch (Amsterdam) artists. Even writers and poets belong to the CoBRA group. The artists' group leaves only three years, but has been the basic for the work of Corneille. According to Corneille, the CoBRA artists want to express themselves on a expressionistic way, like children, by playing unprejudiced with colours and shapes. Since 1950 Corneille lived and worked in Paris. His paintings are bright and colourful. The sun, women, paradise, trees and birds are recurring elements. He is particularly fond of birds. His artist name Corneille is French for 'crow'.

What to do?
Show examples of Corneille's work on the digital board. What issues do you often see in his paintings? What do you notice about his style? Discuss the salient features: bright colours, thick black outlines, few details, painted as if it was made by a child, an image that sometimes is not complete (missing parts at the edges).
In this lesson, students may only sketch very briefly, to avoid drawing to many details and to force them to work big. Allow them to scetch with a pencil for only 5 minutes. Children can also choose to sketch with a narrow brush and light yellow paint. This will automatically result in working big with little details. The yellow lines can easily be painted with different colours later.
Sketching with yellow paint
Scetch the outline of a cat or a bird and make sure this animal reaches at least three edges of the sheet: it should be big! Paint the animail in bright colours and/or patterns. Paint the background too. Leave the work to dry and outline everything using a narrow brush and black paint. Paint with black letters your name somewhere at the work, just like Corneille did. Glue or staple the painting on a coloured sheet.
All artworks made by students of 11 years old

dinsdag 7 september 2010

A picture in pieces

In this lesson students have to copy a piece of a very detailed drawing by using a viewing window. The main issue in this lesson is texture. This lesson is a continuation of 'Exercise in drawing texture'.

You need:

  1. detailed pen-and-ink drawing (download)
  2. pencil
  3. ruler
  4. paperclips
  5. drawing paper
  6. indian ink
  7. dip pen
  8. paper towel
  9. coloured cardboard
  10. cutter and cutting mat
  11. glue

Step 1

Give students half A4 sheet of stiff paper. Draw somewhere in the middle of the sheet a square of 5 by 5 cm and cut it out: this is your viewing window. Measure securely! The square doesn't necessarely have to come in the middle of the sheet, because it will only be used as a viewing window.

Step 2

Give students a sheet of white paper and tell them to draw two or three squares of 5 by 5 cm with some space between them. Students can use the mold from step 1, but measuring and drawing may be a good exercise too. (The squares will be cut at the end of the lesson, so the space between them is not so important.)

Detailed pen-and-ink drawing, click to enlarge

Step 3

Now each student has a viewing window and a drawing sheet with two or three squares on it. Give stuents a copy of the detailed house drawing (or search another drawing yourself) and two paperclips. The mission is: search with the viewing window a piece of the drawing you like most. Fix the viewing window with paperclips on the pen drawing and copy that piece as accurately as possible with indian ink in a square on the drawing sheet. Than copy one or two other pieces.

Step 4

Cut the drawings and paste them on one or more layers of coloured cardboard.

Made by children of 11/12 years old

maandag 6 september 2010

Exercise in drawing texture

You need:

  1. white drawing paper
  2. ruler
  3. pencil
  4. indian ink
  5. dip pen
  6. coloured paper
  7. glue

Tell students about texture: the way something is made, how the surface feels and what structure looks like. Let them feel several textures: the wall, an orange, stuffed animal etc. Discuss how texture can be drawn. A wall is not so difficult, but how do you draw texture in an orange? And how would you draw texture in a stuff animal?

Students draw six squares from 5 by 5 cm on their sheet using a ruler and pencil. Draw with indian ink six different textures in the squares. Cut the squares and make a composition of them on a coloured paper.

zaterdag 4 september 2010

Exercise in colour mixing

You need:

  1. white drawing sheet A3 size
  2. yellow, red and blue tempera paint
  3. brushes
  4. pencil
  5. ruler

Purpose of this lesson to learn students how to make secondary colours. Show Itten's colour circle and discuss it. Tell about primary and secundary colours and show how to make the secundary colours.

Students make a simple drawing on their sheet. In this lesson is chosen for a still life of vases , but you can also opt for houses. After this a 5 cm grid has to be drawn using pencil and ruler. The squares of the objects are painted with primary colours red, yellow and blue; be sure there is never the same color next to each other. The background squares are painted with the secondary colours orange, purple and green. Again: alternate, not the same colour next to each other. To avoid errors, it is useful to write the first letter of the colours in the squares before painting.

dinsdag 31 augustus 2010

Wavy waves

You need:
  1. white drawing sheet A4 size
  2. markers
  3. coloured paper for background
  4. glue
  5. scissors
Draw on a white sheet with pencil four wavy lines from left to right.

Then draw five wavy lines from top to bottom.

Draw a cross of slightly wavy lines in each square.

Choose three colours and colour the triangles: one colour for the bottom triangles of the squares, another colour for the left triangles and a third colour for the triangles on the right. The upper triangle in a square is always white. This is the foamy head of the wave!

Cut a slightly wavy line on the left, right and bottom of the drawing. Cut a strip of the upper triangles away. Paste the work 'wavy' on a coloured sheet.

zaterdag 28 augustus 2010

Name tag in the style of Paul Klee

You need:

  1. white drawing sheet, 15 by 21 cm (A5 size)
  2. pencil
  3. ruler
  4. eraser
  5. markers

This is a great lesson for the beginning of the school: a name tag in the style of painter Paul Klee. This drawing can also be used for the birthday calendar that each group makes at the beginning of the school year.

Paul Klee

Paul Klee (1879 – 1940) is a German/Swiss painter. His work belongs to the modern art. Klee developed mainly as an autodidact and left more than 9000 artworks. In 1912 he saw the work of Picasso and Malevich, and he met Robert Delaunay, who believed colour is the most important element in a painting. After a trip to Tunisia in 1914 Klee started to paint more colorful and abstract. He painted many subjects : landscapes, portraits, animals, mythology, mysterious machines. In his work he combined abstract and figurative shapes. Klee 's work cannot be described in one single word. Surrealism, cubism, abstraction are terms which are applicable to his paintings. He is classified by expressionism. (Source: Wikipedia)

Lesson

Show some artworks of Paul Klee and discuss them. What do you see? Wat zie je? What does strike you? Show finally the work 'Blue Night' and discuss this. Is this like the other works you 've seen? Do you recognize the painting style? What colours are used in Blue Night? How do we call those colours? Students have to make a drawing in Paul Klee style. Divide the sheets of paper. The sheet must be up with the short side. Using a gray pencil and ruler students divide the sheet into three strips of 5 to 21 cm.

Starting top left, write the first letter of your name in capital. The letter must be 5 cm high and touch the first line and the side and top of the sheet. Write the second letter. Be sure the second letter hits the first one, as well as the writing line and the top of the sheet. Do the same with the rest of the letters of your name. If you're ready with your name, start over again.

Writing lines are pink in this example. Click to enlarge.

Proceed on the second line and make sure the letters touch the top of the first line. The third line goes the same way, but the letters should touch the bottom of the sheet and the letters on the second line. See example above. Use an eraser to remove the writing lines. Beware: the letters must stay! So: with an E the bottom line is part of the letter, and should therefore not be erased.

The writing lines are erased. Click to enlarge.

Choose four colours markers. Colour the white spots who are completely surrounded by lines. This might be small spots from the letters, but they could be tall as well because of open letters. Make sure won't get twice the same color side by side. You can prevent this by colouring from top to bottom or from left to right. Choose cool colours just like Klee, or let the kids choose themselves. Just four colours!

Four colours. Example is made with Paintshop. Click to enlarge.

When it is finished, outline with a thick marker. In this example is chosen for silver, because it fits well with the cold colours of the work. To make a birthday calendar for the class, the work has to be pasted on a calendar sheet. This can be drawn, but can also be made on the computer as shown below.

donderdag 26 augustus 2010

Old locomotives in charcoal

You need:

  1. drawing sheet A3 size
  2. charcoal
  3. kneaded eraser
  4. pictures of old locomotives
  5. hairspray
  6. newspapers
Cover the tables with newspapers. Give each student a black/white picture of an old locomotive. This locomotive has to be drawn with charcoal. Use papertowels to smudge the charcoal and kneaded eraser to brighten up. Use another sheet under the drawing had to prevent stains. Fix the artwork with hairspray.

dinsdag 24 augustus 2010

A sea of flowers

You need:
  1. white drawing paper A4 size
  2. waterpaint
  3. brushes
  4. jars with water
  5. black permanent marker

A sea of flowers is an expression used for fields with so many flowers, that you can hardly see the end of it. Let children see examples of 'a sea of flowers'. Have you ever seen a sea of flowers yourself? Where or when?

Tell the students they are going to paint a sea of flowers, but literally! Flowers in the water, a lot of them!

Let the children directly paint their flowers, so no pencil drawing first. They use water paint and (lots of) water. Choose different colours and shapes, and paint steals and leaves too. Do not only paint in the middle of the sheet, but also at the edge so you can see half flowers. (If you choose this lesson for a group work, children should make agreements about the places their flowers will come together and the colours of the flowers).

When the flowers are ready, students paint the background with light blue waterpaint. Paint as close as possible along the flowers , but do not touche them to prevent colours from running together. Leave the work to dry. Outline the flowers with a black marker. All spots and white edges are thus concealed.

Paste all works together to create a group work: our sea of flowers!

zondag 22 augustus 2010

Funky slippers

By Marrit, 11 years old

You need:
  1. two white drawing sheets A4 size
  2. coloured construction paper
  3. two split pens or paper fasteners
  4. scissors
  5. glue
  6. markers
Tear wide strips of the narrow side of a sheet of light blue and a dark blue sheet construction paper. Paste thes over and over and partially overlapping on a white sheet of paper: these are the waves of the sea in which your slippers will disappear! You can also choose yellow paper and sandpaper, to suggest the beach. Trace your foot on the second white sheet. Cut it twice. Remember that one of them should be a mirror image. Colour the slippers with bright summer colours.

Cut out of the remaining white paper four strips of about 15 cm long and 1.5 cm wide. Colour these too. Prick a hole in both flip-flops on the spot between the big toe and second toe. Prick holes in the four strips, approximately 0.5 cm from the end. Insert a split pin through the two strips and the slipper. Glue the ends of the strips under the slipper. Paste the slippers on the sheet with waves.

zaterdag 21 augustus 2010

Selfportrait in manga style

You need:

  1. half A4 size drawing sheet
  2. colour pencils
  3. black marker

Manga consist of comics and print cartoons in the Japanese language and conforming to the style developed in Japan in the late 19th century. In their modern form, manga date from shortly after World War II but they have a long, complex pre-history in earlier Japanese art.

The name comes from 'uncontrolled or random brushstrokes'. This refers to the loose style of drawing. Anime is the term used for manga style cartoon films. Ask students some examples of anime films. They probably know Pokemon and Dragonball Z. Show them some manga style drawings, there are lots of them on the internet. Discuss the remarkable things about manga:

  • the characters tend to be slim and attractive
  • in the comics for kids, the characters have large expressive eyes
  • nose and mouth often consist of a smooth line
  • the hair colours are striking and often unnatural
  • the heads are large in proportion to body
There are numerous internet sites where you can learn to draw manga. Google op 'how to draw manga'. For almost each body part you can find sites. During this lesson the students make a portrait of their face in manga style. Give them the schedule for the head (on the blackboard or a copy).

Discuss how students can make the manga figure look like himself. Discuss how the head itself can look like a manga self portrait. Think of appearance as a hairstyle, glasses, moles, colour of the eyes, jewelry etc. Students draw their own head and shoulders in manga style. Colour with coloured pencil, outline with black marker.

vrijdag 20 augustus 2010

Selfportrait in black and white

You need:
  1. canvas
  2. digital photograph
  3. acrylic paint
  4. brushes
  5. carbon paper
  6. pen
Show portraits made by Andy Warhol and discuss them. What is remarkable about those portraits? Would you recognize a Warhol? Why is that?
To make this selfportrait each child needs a digital portrait of himself. Use a photo editor to make the photo black and white. I used Corel Paint Shop Pro. Choose for 'image' and then 'grayscale'. Then click on 'effects', choose 'artistic effects' and then 'posterize'. Choose for four or five layers.
Print the photograph and trace it with a pen and carbon paper on a canvas. Paint the portrait with acrylic paint in greyscale. Paint the background in your choice of colours.